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STKBANNER

Author: Spare The Kids

Facebook Live Reading & Discussion

3/21/2017

Dr. Stacey Patton reads from her new book, Spare the Kids: Why Whupping Children Won’t Save Black America and engages her audience with a Q & A discussion on Facebook live.

The Lasuncet Family

Dawnnesha Lasuncet and her children sign a pledge to make their home a violence-free zone!

The #NoHittingChallenge is part of Spare the Kids’ mission to help parents find alternative ways to discipline without physical punishment.  Making the change starts with making a committment to change. If you would like to take the pledge and share your video with us, please send it to info@sparethekids.com. We would love for you to join this movement!

Congratulations, Lasuncet family!

 

The Reid Family

Alicia Reid and her son sign a pledge to make their home a violence-free zone!

The #NoHittingChallenge is part of Spare the Kids’ mission to help parents find alternative ways to discipline without physical punishment.  Making the change starts with making a committment to change. If you would like to take the pledge and share your video with us, please send it to info@sparethekids.com. We would love for you to join this movement!

Congratulations, Reid Family!

The Adison Family

Donnie Adison and her son sign a pledge to make their home a no-hitting zone! Just look at the sparkling pride in that dear boy’s eyes!

The #NoHittingChallenge is part of Spare the Kids’ mission to help parents find alternative ways to discipline without physical punishment.  Making the change starts with making a committment to change. If you would like to take the pledge and share your video with us, please send it to info@sparethekids.com. We would love for you to join this movement!

Congratulations, Adison family!

The Malohifo’ou Family

Mark and Michael Malohifo’ou are our first participants to sign a pledge to not hit their son. “We don’t hit!” the Malohifo’ou family declares.  Upon completing the pledge, watch how their adorable son celebrates.

The #NoHittingChallenge is part of Spare the Kids’ mission to help parents find alternative ways to discipline without physical punishment.  Making the change starts with making a committment to change.

Congratulations Malohifo’ou Family!!!

The Parent-to-Prison Pipeline

Research shows that black parents are more than twice as likely as white and Latino parents to use corporal punishment on a regular basis, and they are far less likely to never spank their children.  But while hitting children is prevalent in black communities, contrary to popular belief, it is not an intrinsic cultural tradition to which members of the child welfare professionals should capitulate for the sake of demonstrating cultural competency. Black parents have legitimate fears about the safety of their children, and an overwhelming majority believe physical discipline is necessary to keep black children out of the streets, out of prison, or out of cops’ line of vision. Black parents who hit their children not only risk catching the attention of child protective services which are over-concentrated in communities of color, but also having their children placed in foster care, which is a pipeline to the juvenile justice system and other types of traps that disproportionately impact black youth.  This workshop is designed to educate professionals, parents, clergy, law enforcement officials and advocates about the rise of mass incarceration and its impact on communities of color and their parenting practices.  The audience will explore strategies that parents can protect, care for, and love black children in ways that don’t help facilitate the flow of our young people through racist systems, but supports healthy development and success later in life.

Understanding the Rise of Digi-Punishment in African American Communities

This workshop will examine the growing trend of parents publicly beating and shaming their children by posting pictures or videos of their discipline tactics on popular social media sites.  For example, a YouTube search yields more than 30,000 matches for child-shaming videos.  Dr. Stacey Patton will discuss the cultural phenomenon behind why digi-punishment is seen as a creative form of discipline in African American communities.  She will also examine the long-term effects that cyber-shaming has on a child’s brain development and emotional health, and how it places children at risk for being bullied at school and abused by child predators who seek out insecure kids with low self-esteem.  The audience will brainstorm ways to educate parents about the dangers of digi-punishment, discuss what the role of law enforcement and child protective services should be in protecting children from this kind of abuse, and explore positive ways to encourage parents to use alternative forms of discipline.

Beyond Secrets: Navigating the Challenges of Adoption and Adoption Reunions

This workshop will examine two controversies: open vs. closed adoptions and their impact on adopted children and their families, and the legal issues and concerns around allowing adult adoptees the right to access their birth records. Dr. Stacey Patton blends the power of her first-hand experience as an adoptee with powerful research and media coverage as various states grapple with the possibilities and challenges of changing legislation. Dr. Patton will also address the emotional turmoil surrounding the reunion process and discuss the need for appropriate counseling that will help adoptees, adoptive families and biological families more effectively navigate the process of reconnecting and managing expectations.

Step Into My Shoes: Growing Up in Foster Care

Direct care providers face many hurdles when trying to effectively communicate with the youth they serve.  This unique and dynamic workshop will address those obstacles through the personal testimony of Stacey Patton who takes the audience on a journey through the eyes and emotions of a child in foster care.  Youth participants are able to have their experiences validated while being inspired to polish their own communication skills and learn how to constructively work within the system.  Likewise, direct care providers and other participants will gain insights into the unique challenges and emotional dynamics experienced by young people in foster care.

Safe Sanctuaries: Working with African American Clergy to Reduce Racial Disparities in Child Abuse

Historically, the African-American church has preached the gospel of “spare the rod, spoil child.” This message has reached far beyond the pulpit and is often used to support the culture of family violence. This workshop is designed for faith-leaders of all backgrounds to examine religious texts and the impact on culture and family values as they relate to physical discipline of children. The richness and value of this unique workshop is that it will fully engage participants in a guided discussion where scripture, beliefs and the power of the pulpit are examined in relation to how faith leaders can change the culture of black family violence. Faith leaders have unprecedented influence and power in black communities. Fully engaging them in this discussion is a vital first step in working to change the conversation on physical discipline and the culture of family violence.

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